Food Sensitivities, Meals, Recipes

Chili Con Carne

Due to their high sulfur and acid content, I’m extremely sensitive to tomatoes.  But I still love my late mother’s recipe for Chili Con Carne, so I developed a work around.

While red peppers, garlic and onions all contain sulfur, I find that this works for me on occasion, since the load is less than if I used tomatoes as the recipe calls for.

Some chili aficionados will blanch, because yes, I do thicken this dish.  Traditionally, it is thickened with flour, but I often use potato starch to avoid the wheat.  I also use as many organic ingredients as I can, but I still haven’t found organic spiced chili beans.

I cook this dish and other soups and stews in my Le Creuset cookware, but any type of heavy pan will do.

Serve it up with your favorite grated cheese, chopped onions, sour cream or condiments of your choice.

In our house this dish  is usually accompanied by saltines.  When I was a child, I would slather them with butter and marmelade.  Today, I just skip them.

Chili Con Carne

1 lb. ground beef

1 Spanish onion, chopped

1 clove garlic, peeled and smashed

1 16 oz. jar Mediterranean Organic Fire Roasted Red Peppers, drained

2 15 oz. cans Chili Beans

20 oz. water

Salt and Pepper

1/4 c. organic  white flour or Bob’s Red Mill potato starch

5 tsps. ground chili powder

Saute the ground beef in a large heavy saucepan, dutch oven or enameled cast iron pan. When it is brown, add the chopped onions and saute until soft.  Add the garlic clove and saute for 1 minute.

While the meat is browning, drain and rinse the peppers and process in a food processor until liquid.

Add the peppers, water, beans, salt and pepper.

Bring to a boil, then simmer uncovered for 1 hour.

Combine the flour or potato starch with 5 tsps. powered chili and add to the dish, stirring well until combined.  Simmer for a further 15 minutes and serve.

 

 

 

 

 

Food Sensitivities, Meals, Ramblings

The Nightshades We Eat or… Not

While the actual Deadly Nightshade plant has purple flowers, it’s less toxic relatives have a mix of colors including white, blue, yellow and purple.

The following plants which produce food we eat are:

Eggplant, Tomatoes, Tomatillos, Pimentos, all Peppers, including Bell, Chili, Cayenne and Paprika, and all varieties of Potato. (Sweet potatoes and yams are not true potatoes).

The last surprising plant in this family is Tobacco.

All nightshades contain toxic compounds called glycoalkaloids.  These compounds act as natural pesticides, protecting the plants from a wide range of insects and other disease bearing micro-organisms.

Sensitive individuals may experience various forms of gastric distress after ingesting these foods.

My experience has been that potatoes do not bother me at all.  Tomatoes, which are also high in sulphur, are a problem, as are raw peppers.  I tend to suffer heartburn and indigestion.  I dislike eggplant and pimentos, so no problems there for me.  I use a lot of paprika in my cooking and it has never been a problem.

When I started working on eliminating tomatoes from my diet, I substituted Mediterranean Organic Organic Fire Roasted Red Peppers in my chili con carne recipe and it turned out delicious.