Food Sensitivities, Meals, Recipes

Chili Con Carne

Due to their high sulfur and acid content, I’m extremely sensitive to tomatoes.  But I still love my late mother’s recipe for Chili Con Carne, so I developed a work around.

While red peppers, garlic and onions all contain sulfur, I find that this works for me on occasion, since the load is less than if I used tomatoes as the recipe calls for.

Some chili aficionados will blanch, because yes, I do thicken this dish.  Traditionally, it is thickened with flour, but I often use potato starch to avoid the wheat.  I also use as many organic ingredients as I can, but I still haven’t found organic spiced chili beans.

I cook this dish and other soups and stews in my Le Creuset cookware, but any type of heavy pan will do.

Serve it up with your favorite grated cheese, chopped onions, sour cream or condiments of your choice.

In our house this dish  is usually accompanied by saltines.  When I was a child, I would slather them with butter and marmelade.  Today, I just skip them.

Chili Con Carne

1 lb. ground beef

1 Spanish onion, chopped

1 clove garlic, peeled and smashed

1 16 oz. jar Mediterranean Organic Fire Roasted Red Peppers, drained

2 15 oz. cans Chili Beans

20 oz. water

Salt and Pepper

1/4 c. organic  white flour or Bob’s Red Mill potato starch

5 tsps. ground chili powder

Saute the ground beef in a large heavy saucepan, dutch oven or enameled cast iron pan. When it is brown, add the chopped onions and saute until soft.  Add the garlic clove and saute for 1 minute.

While the meat is browning, drain and rinse the peppers and process in a food processor until liquid.

Add the peppers, water, beans, salt and pepper.

Bring to a boil, then simmer uncovered for 1 hour.

Combine the flour or potato starch with 5 tsps. powered chili and add to the dish, stirring well until combined.  Simmer for a further 15 minutes and serve.

 

 

 

 

 

Food Sensitivities, Meals, Ramblings

Welcome

Welcome to Deadly Nightshade:  Living with Serious Food Sensitivities.

After years of battling health problems caused by the food I was eating and being told repeatedly that I wasn’t allergic to anything, I finally decided to approach things from another perspective.  Nutritionists and other medical personnel were just starting to talk about food sensitivities as opposed to allergies.  If you are truly allergic to something you have a respiratory reaction.  That was never my problem.  Constant gastric distress?  Yes.

I get extremely ill when given sulfa drugs (it runs in the family) and one day it dawned on me. I wasn’t truly allergic to them, but I definitely was sensitive to them.  They made me extremely nauseous, followed by extreme hyperactivity.

And, if sulfa drugs are made from sulfur, then what about the sulfur found in so many foods?  It was the early days of the internet and I ran across an article by a woman who was suffering from an extreme auto-immune disease.  In her research, she discovered that the common denominator was sulfur rich foods. When she eliminated them from her diet, her illness went into remission.

Luckily, I’ve found that sulfur sensitivity is usually a saturation issue.  You can be fine for years, then it hits you.  The good news is, you can detox. I was so ill by this time that I chose to follow her recommendations.  I spent two months eating only carrots, celery, pork, potatoes, white meat poultry and organic melons.  I lost weight, because I was no longer bloating and all my gastric problems went away.

This detox made it possible for me to eat again normally for awhile, but the problems kept coming back as my saturation levels rose again.  And I’m no saint.  It’s hard to avoid everything you enjoy.

Eventually, I started to develop work arounds.  Substituting different vegetables for those that caused me the most problems.  Fortunately, a lot of things are ok if they are organic, because they are not picking up sulfur and sulfites from non-organic fertilizers.

So, while I don’t expect anyone to actually poison themselves with Deadly Nightshade, I did decide to use it as a title for my blog, because there are so many foods in the nightshade family that we eat on a regular basis and tomatoes are the bane of my existence.

As I continue writing this blog, I will be including my work around ideas and recipes that my family and I enjoy.  We will also have guest bloggers from time to time, contributing their recipes and stories of their food sensitivities.